KKB goes to Edinburgh… Land of Castles, Cafes, Rhythm and Rhymes

Kilonshele Everybody

Edinburgh University African Caribbean Society invited me to give a reading of Memoirs of a Young African at the Rhythm and Rhymes event last week- I HAD A BLAST!!!!! Edinburgh is a wonderful city that is built to enable its inhabitants and visitors to move at a measured pace with eloquent efficiency. I arrived at Edinburg Airport early on Wednesday morning and took a bus into the city centre to my humble abode for the night. I got off at the Walfdorf Astoria, admired this magnificent hotel for a few moments before taking another bus to the guesthouse my hosts had graciously booked for me. My perception about Scotland didn’t go beyond the usual, Tartan Kilt, bagpipes, haggis, and William Wallace. I was so excited when upon reaching the guest house I was greeted by a man wearing a kilt, alas he was not an indigene; he was from Lithuania. I was tempted to buy haggis from the local chip shop but I decided that my first taste of this delicacy should be in more authentic environment.

My first visit was to a local café; it was cosy and beautifully decorated. The number of independent café’s in the city added to its sense of tranquillity. I hope they continue to resist the soulless multinational coffee shops on every street corner in London. I had planned to visit Edinburgh Castle but I was advised to take the sightseeing open top bus to tour the city instead. I went to the nearest bus stop, approximately 20 minute walk from the café. After waiting impatiently for about 25 minutes, I decided to visit the castle instead which was at the top of a hill behind the bus stop. I made my way towards the castle, and was confronted by approximately 100+ vertical steps. I began to make my way up these steps reluctantly. When I reached the last step at the top, I looked back down and was shocked to see the bus approaching the bus stop. I ran back down the stairs but could only watch helplessly as it drove off when just as I reached the last bottom step. I was angry and exhausted; I couldn’t face going back up the stairs again so I decided to wait for the next tour bus. You can only imagine my chagrin when the very next stop on the tour was by the top the steps by the castle. I thoroughly enjoyed the tour; Edinburgh is a city, which has majestically kept up with modernity whilst keeping its historical buildings and parks.

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge a bright and lovely young lady by the name of Shuwanna Arron. She is the African Caribbean Society president and made this reading possible. I was one of the guest perfumers at an event called Rhythm and Rhymes. The last time I was on a University Campus was 12 years ago and this night I felt like an elder statesman amongst these young students. I read a few extracts from MOAYA which was well received by the audience, laughter and applause filled the room. I was overwhelmed when a few of the students approached me afterwards not only to congratulate for the reading but

they commended me for writing such an important book. One student said that based on the extracts I had read, it was a mirror into his own life.

Public speaking is one of my greatest fears, thanks to Shuwanna, Edinburgh University, The African Caribbean Society and all those who gave me words of encouragement- I have just taken the first of many steps to conquering this challenge. This is the first of many public events by KKB… stay tuned

Reading extracts from MOAYA

Reading extracts from MOAYA

writing in the cafe

writing in the cafe

THOSE DAMN STAIRS

  THOSE DAMN STAIRS

Me and the wonderful Shuwanna A

Me and the wonderful Shuwanna

Sight seeing in The Burgh

Sight seeing in The Burgh

 

Reading MOAYA....

Reading MOAYA….

 

Till next time-

KKB Out

50th Blog Post—The Journey so Far!!!!

“The purpose of challenges in life is to overcome them. You can climb over, dig deep or smash through, but never retreat; because when greater challenges arise in the future, you will have in your possession the tools attained in conquering the smaller challenges from the past”. Kabir Kareem-Bello

KILONSHELE MY PEOPLE…….Warmest greeting and salutations……. KKB HAIL YOU ALL O……

The Journey Begins

The Journey Begins

When I posted my first blog on the on the 18th September 2013, I was on the personal quest for meaning and I did not know the destination. This is now the 50th post, what a journey it has been. Firstly, I must thank the most important contributors to KILONSHELE-KKB, YOU MY READERS. If you have been following from the 1st post or just joined recently, I hope you have had a fruitful and enjoyable journey. Without your support, I would not have made the giant strides I have made over the past couple of years. I must acknowledge and thank my Chairman Tega (KKB VS THE CHAIRMAN) and my dear sister Alahaja Moshood (Change is Inevitable) for their enlightening contributions.

I have thoroughly enjoyed writing this blog, which has contributed enormously to my intellectual growth. The earliest posts were the most enjoyable to write. They were the most intimate and funny because it was the beginning of a personal journey of finding myself. I was at a Crossroads in my life and this blog gave me a sense of purpose and direction. I was able to write about inspirational characters I met like Mathew the Rewirer; the Motor boys of Lagos and the guys for “The People You Meet” posts. Although I didn’t know it when I began, some of these early posts were the start of the Quest 4 Identity series.

I would say that my best pieces of writing were:

  • Google is God
  • I will not Apologise; and
  • Quest for Identity Series Part 2: Black History Month: Is it still relevant?

There were extremely important topics and I felt a sense of responsibility to share my thoughts.

The most difficult posts to write were those from the KKB in 9iaja part 2 blocs, in December 2014. The Poor Education vs. No Education piece was especially challenging. Although I still regret not sharing the experiences which prompted the “Freedom without Discipline=Chaos” post; I have learnt and grown from those experiences which itself requires a great deal of courage. My favourite character has to be the taxi driver from the “Fight at the pump” post; I still cannot believe that man’s audaciousness.

My greatest joy is making people laugh, I will be forever grateful that some of my posts has brought smiles to many faces. I hope that other posts have inspired you and enabled some critical thinking in this new age of populism and zombies. Writing these posts has given me the courage to face and overcome many challenges in my life. It has provided me with the opportunity to meet wide a range of individuals who have contributed to its success without even knowing. Kilonshele-KKB.COM has enabled me to evaluate and re-evaluate my viewpoints on many of life’s issues and has inspired me to continue my pursuit to change the world for the better.

Thank you again for being on this journey with me, I truly appreciate it and I hope we can continue together. Please share your thoughts on your favourite or most inspiring post(s) in the comments section below.

KKB SALUTES YOU ALL………..

Till next time, KKB OUT.

 

The journey continues...destination unknown....

The journey continues…destination unknown….

Mathew the rewirer

Mathew the rewirer

The people you meet!!

The people you meet!!

Diaspora or Citizen?

Kilonshele ladies and gentlemen

Things will be a little different for this week’s post, I would like to ask you a question in order to open up a discussion.  I recently described myself to someone as “A product of the diaspora with my roots in Nigeria”. After a couple of minutes of reflection I thought to myself “What the f*ck are you talking about”? I still don’t know, so I would like to ask:

Can one consider oneself a Member of the Diaspora Community and also a Full Citizen of the resident country? Is this a paradox or compatible?

Feel free share your thoughts in the comments box below and share this post/question with others.

Till next time

KKB Out